“the messy part”

So into days installment I show a couple of boat related things and then talk about my on going work with Paulsboat. First did you know i make survival bracelets? I do it as a side hobby while watching tv to help pay for things like building boats. I just finished 50 for a day camp.

these payed for the epoxy and glass I needed. They are made form paracord. I travel with a lot of extra rope now that I make my own lanyards, zipper pulls, anklets, and bracelets. I plan on giving these away as prizes for those who finish the OBX this year. you can find my store here, hit me up if you have a custom order for an event or camp. http://www.etsy.com/shop/UhFrayedKnot?ref=si_shop

I took out the piccup yesterday to a small lake. this was it’s second sail and I fixed the problem I had with the halyard laying right and added the reef ropes. It sails well and I feel confident now in taking out into the Delaware river next week.

Here is Paul T. sailing my boat at Marsh Creek state park. He is a friend from the eastern messabout.

I like the way the sail and rigging came out. I have a topping lift which is also a spare halyard and will also help me rig a boom tent.

Here is student and fiend of mine sailing for the first time. i try to convert as many people as possible. He is going to come with me on to the Delaware and sail around little tinicum island up to the civil war fort mifflin.

In a recent email from jim he said, “now you’re at the messy part.”  So now let me show off some pictures of the work I have done on the Paulsboat. The inside seams.

I ain’t doing the how i did it thing this time around. Here is the rear compartment with the bridge deck beams just placed there to show a little bit of the final shape.

here is looking down one of the cockpit seams. you can see where I cut out the temp bulk head corners  for quickness.

Here is the Bow compartment with the center beam just placed there to show where it goes.

Here is looking forward at the bow point from inside the watertight compartment.

I flipped it and started checking all the lines again to find that it was closer to perfect then I thought. sweet!

The bow is perfect and cut just as drawn. Jim must be getting good at this. This is one of the parts he really wants to make sure is all good before sending out to customers.

checking out the lines.

nice stern baby.

Still light at this point. I am easily on track to getting it weighing 100 lbs. hopefully less.

A close up of the flux capacitor. (that’s a back to the future reference for you.) this is the one part where I thought to myself I could have set the bilge panels 1/8″ farther back when i put it all together, but really it doesn’t matter. still looks good and will sail just as good.

And one more look from the other direction.

So I plan on have the bottom glassed this week and making the sails for this boat as well as new sails for the roonio catamaran and sean’s new yawl rigged Toon 2.

Tune in next time when we find out if bat man can get that shark off his leg. same bat channel, same bat time.

Paul

The inside took about 12 hours of work. What does that make the total so far? I think 42 hours.

 

 

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2 Responses to “the messy part”

  1. lvacgar says:

    Do you glass over your zip ties and leave them inside? I am about to embark on my first stitch and glue project. I have plenty of zip ties, as well as 18 guage copper wire at hand. Unsure which to use…

  2. themoffitt says:

    you probably know this all but:
    i cut them and leave them inside. that is the whole point on using copper or plastic, they dont rust. when i did the piccup last year and used copper on that one. The time in about the same., The differences are copper you use a good pair of dykes, zip ties you use a box cutter. The whole you drill for a zip tie is larger then for copper. when I do it again I will probably do zip ties again.

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